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Malaria - our approach

Since 2003, Malaria Consortium has been fighting malaria in countries across Africa and Asia, in partnership with communities, government and non-government organisations.

In our work on malaria, we focus especially on providing technical and operational support for national malaria control programmes. This includes supporting the distribution and improved use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), reducing the spread of drug resistance, improving case management of malaria at community and health facility levels, strengthening and improving capacity for surveillance and monitoring of the disease, and carrying out operational research to ensure that solid evidence supports effective delivery of services through strengthened health systems.   

We help governments in various stages of malaria control to increase their capacity and accomplish their goals by providing expertise, resources and strategic planning.

Containing the spread of drug resistance

Our Asia programme is supporting efforts to eliminating the threat of artemisinin drug resistance and ultimately eliminating malaria by building and improving capacity for surveillance and monitoring, providing effective and timely treatment and ensuring best practice through behaviour change communication projects.

Providing community based primary health care

In an effort to create sustainable and accessible lasting healthcare for remote populations, we provide training and resources for community based health workers, training them to diagnose and treat malaria accurately, and building their capacity to manage other common childhood illnesses, including pneumonia and diarrhoea to create a more integrated approach to care in the community. In some contexts, we integrate nutrition interventions as malnutrition is both a risk factor for and a consequence of malaria and other infectious diseases.  

Improving capacity for surveillance and monitoring

In order to track the spread of the disease, we implement innovative solutions and technologies to identify and treat cases of malaria. Our Beyond Garki operational research project in Ethiopia, Uganda and Nigeria, for example, demonstrated the impact of any and all malaria control interventions in a particular area thereby demonstrating which combinations had the most success. In an elimination setting disease surveillance is of increasing importance. We have introduced several innovative pilots, such as community health worker SMS messaging in Cambodia for case identification and mapping and cross-border surveillance of migrant workers to help track and treat those elusive last infections.

Carrying out operational research

We carry out a wide range of operational research studies through our own implementation activities as well as with partners. These include supporting national baseline and indicator surveys, and national external reviews of malaria control. We frequently conduct surveys looking at knowledge, perceptions and behaviour related to use of malaria preventive commodities in the populations that we serve. We also engage in policy analysis and development at a global and regional level, based on evidence from country programmes.

Implementing behaviour change communication interventions

An essential element of our work at community level is to create awareness and increase usage of community-based health services among the target populations and to strengthen their capacity to manage their own health and make informed decisions. We have organised community dialogues in areas where we work in addition to piloting innovate projects such as our positive deviance project, which seeks to highlight health-seeking behaviours within communities. 

 

Malaria