Share this page

Our policy impacts

While we do not have an office in Malawi, we have supported the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) to develop the 2019-2022 national Insecticide Resistance Management (IRM). This will help Malawi to develop and implement appropriate insecticide resistance monitoring and management strategies to maintain the effectiveness of existing vector control interventions, and provide detailed guidance on selection and rotation of chemicals for indoor residual spraying (to delay development of insecticide resistance) and types of insecticide-treated nets to use in each epidemiological setting.

We are also working with the NMCP to develop the Integrated Vector Control Strategy (IVCS) for Malaria Control (2020–2024), which will be completed by mid 2020. The IVCS incorporates strategies to develop capacities for entomological monitoring to support the planning, deployment and evaluation of locally appropriate and effective vector control interventions; and guidance for the selection and evidence-based targeting of effective interventions according to transmission intensity, insecticide resistance, cost-effectiveness considerations, and other relevant factors. All of the above activities were implemented within the US President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) VectorLink Project.

Through the ACCESS-SMC programme, we worked with the malaria programmes of seven Sahel countries (Burkina Faso, Chad, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and The Gambia) to rapidly scale up Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) by providing technical, logistical and financial support for its implementation. Today, we continue our SMC work supporting the malaria programme of Burkina Faso. As a key implementing partner, we use existing health system mechanisms as much as possible. This ranges from developing high level plans and policies at central level, right down to identifying the number of health workers and community distributors needed down in the most remote locations.

We also aim to inform policy and practice of SMC implementation by contributing to the evidence base through research, monitoring and evaluation and systematic learning. Our SMC work is funded through philanthropic donations, as well through grants from the Global Fund and UK aid. Much of the philanthropic funding we receive for SMC is a result of Malaria Consortium’s SMC programme being awarded Top Charity status by GiveWell for the fourth year running.

Starting in 2020, we will support National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) to develop a five-year national insecticide resistance management (IRM) plan. This will help Burkina Faso to develop and implement appropriate insecticide resistance monitoring and management strategies to maintain the effectiveness of existing vector control interventions, and provide detailed guidance on selection and rotation of chemicals for indoor residual spraying (to delay development of insecticide resistance) and types of insecticide-treated nets to use in each epidemiological setting. The IRM plan will be implemented within the US President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) VectorLink Project.

 

 



We are collaborating with the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) and provincial health authorities to implement the Regional artemisinin initiative to elimination (RAI2E) north project  that provides mobile malaria services for hard-to-reach communities in northeast Cambodia. We helped to establish mobile malaria posts, outreach activities and reactive case detection, all of which are now all embedded into the government’s overall health education programme and vector control strategy. We also recruited and trained Mobile Malaria Workers (MMWs) to support government staff in delivering community-based health promotion and education activities targeted at forest workers.

We supported two Cambodian ministries (the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport) to implement a cross-sectoral dengue prevention project that reduced mosquito breeding sites and limit the spread of dengue by trialling a socio-ecological vector control strategy that combines evidence-based biophysical with social interventions. We collaboratively built an understanding with the ministries around how such an approach can be implemented to expand the evidence base for effective dengue prevention and control, and be used for future interventions of a similar nature.

We supported the development of the Malaria Elimniation Action Framework and provided technical assistance to the Cambodian Government to conduct “The Cambodia Mobile & Migrant Population (MMP) Survey 2017.” The survey created a detailed picture of the key MMPs, which informed Global Fund monitoring and evaluating activities to establish a more systematic evidence-base for the development of effective malaria elimination strategies targeting these groups. We provided similar assistance in drafting the National Malaria Control Programme’s “MMPs in the context of Malaria Elimination - Operational Manual.”

 

 

 

Through the ACCESS-SMC programme, we worked with the malaria programmes of seven Sahel countries (Burkina Faso, Chad, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and The Gambia) to rapidly scale up Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) by providing technical, logistical and financial support for its implementation. Today, we continue our SMC work supporting the malaria programme of Chad. As a key implementing partner, we use existing health system mechanisms as much as possible. This ranges from developing high level plans and policies at central level, right down to identifying the number of health workers and community distributors needed down in the most remote locations.

We also aim to inform policy and practice of SMC implementation by contributing to the evidence base through research, monitoring and evaluation and systematic learning. Our SMC work is funded through philanthropic donations, as well through grants from the Global Fund and UK aid. Much of the philanthropic funding we receive for SMC is a result of Malaria Consortium’s SMC programme being awarded Top Charity status by GiveWell for the fourth year running.

We supported the implementation of the Ethiopian Government's Health Sector Transformation Plan through our Transform: Primary Health Care project, which sought to strengthen the quality of services provided across the primary health continuum with the goal of achieving malaria elimination by 2030. The project supported the capacity of antenatal care providers to deliver improved malaria case management; capturing accurate data on malaria in pregnancy; and providing technical assistance for undertaking quality assessments for rapid diagnostic testing of malaria and other activities.

We have been working with the Federal Ministry of Health (FMoH) to reduce malaria morbidity and severity in Ethiopia by increasing the management and technical capacity of the primary health care unit to maintain high coverage and the use of high impact malaria control interventions. The project will also improve malaria care-seeking behaviour and household practices of the community in relation to effective use of anti-malaria interventions. In addition, the project will strengthen the health system’s capacity on outbreak detection and response, malaria surveillance and use of data for decision making.

We have been working with the Ministry of Health to support the Neglected Tropical Disease Program through developing and evaluating interventions to strengthen and integrate the detection, management, recording and reporting of selected neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) into the country’s Primary Health Care system.

We supported Federal Ministry of Health child health program through evaluating acceptability and usability of Philip’s ChARM and Massimo’s Rad G automated devices for the detection of symptoms of pneumonia in children under five.

We established the Coalition Against Malaria in Ethiopia group, that is chaired by the Ministry of Health but operates as an independent civil society advocacy organization.

 

We work with the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) to strengthen the malaria surveillance system focusing on improving data quality and data use for strategic and operational decision making at different administrative level. We are assessing the feasibility of reactive surveillance approaches in very low transmission settings including (focal Mass Drug Administration) when implemented under programmatic bases. Lessons learned from these activities will provide the NMCP with a set of recommendations to use in future elimination efforts.

We created the digital health platform upSCALE together with the Ministry of Health (MoH) and Unicef, that built on the success of a 2009-2016 project we led called inSCALE, which was an interactive mobile phone application that improved quality of care provided by Community Health Workers (CHWs) in Inhambane province. We are now working in conjunction with the MoH now to roll out upSCALE nationwide by the end of 2020 and we will provide the technical assistance to build capacity, implement and manage the platform at all levels of the health system. Through this collaboration, Malaria Consortium has built up strong expertise in designing and rolling out integrated mHealth solutions.

 

 

Through our Expansion of Rural Access to Community-Led Services to Address Malaria and Childhood Illnesses project we supported the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) to train malaria volunteers (MVs). We introduced systematic quality supervision mechanisms and toolkits that the NMCP will replicate nationally for over 10,000 MVs deployed across the country.

We worked with the Malaria Technical Strategic Group that brought together multiple government departments to input into the national malaria strategic plan. We will continue our involvement with a focus on supporting government to develop funding requests to major donors.

In 2016–2017, Malaria Consortium piloted an integrated community case management (iCCM) approach in three townships in Sagaing, in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Sports (MoHS), the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) and township health department. This pilot was successful and we expanded the approach to six townships in the region in 2017.

Through our Transitional, enhanced, accessible malaria surveillance (TEAMS) project, we supported the NMCP to strengthen Myanmar's surveillance, and monitoring and evaluation systems to help the country meet its malaria elimination objectives. After developing a new malaria surveillance tool, we rolled out the database in 164 townships in Myanmar.

For over a decade, we have supported the development of national and state-level malaria control strategies in Nigeria. Our evidence and recommendations supported the development of the National Malaria Strategic Plan (2014-2020), implemented through our SuNMaP and SuNMaP2 programmes.  

Our strong relationship with national and state-level malaria elimination programmes has led us to advise on annual operational plans and strategies that have seen over 100 million long lasting insecticidal nets distributed.

We have seconded staff to the Ministry of Health National Malaria Elimination Programme (NMEP), working exclusively on SuNMaP 2, who directly influence government malaria policy, with a specific focus on capacity building and learning.

We are supporting the Nigerian National Primary Health Care Development Agency to provide technical assistance to support Niger state in north-central Nigeria with the implementation of a community-based primary healthcare programme that is integrated with the Community Health Influencers, Promoters and Services (CHIPS) programme.

Through the ACCESS-SMC programme, we worked with the malaria programmes of seven Sahel countries (Burkina Faso, Chad, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and The Gambia) to rapidly scale up Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) by providing technical, logistical and financial support for its implementation. Today, we continue our SMC work supporting the malaria programme of Nigeria. As a key implementing partner, we use existing health system mechanisms as much as possible. This ranges from developing high level plans and policies at central level, right down to identifying the number of health workers and community distributors needed down in the most remote locations.

We also aim to inform policy and practice of SMC implementation by contributing to the evidence base through research, monitoring and evaluation and systematic learning. Our SMC work is funded through philanthropic donations, as well through grants from the Global Fund and UK aid. Much of the philanthropic funding we receive for SMC is a result of Malaria Consortium’s SMC programme being awarded Top Charity status by GiveWell for the fourth year running.

Since 2017, we have worked with the Ministry of Health (MoH), selected state and county authorities and health departments to pilot and roll out the country’s flagship strategy for community-based primary healthcare: the Boma Health Initiative (BHI). We have helped develop and strengthen policy guidelines, to build capacity to support the trial phase, cascade training from the national through to village levels, and supervise Community Health Workers' delivery of health promotion, disease prevention and treatment services. Many of our recommendations have been adopted by the MoH in the national scale-up of the BHI to ensure equitable, country-wide access to healthcare.

We collaborated with the Ministry of Health (MoH) to run an innovative programme where treatment for malnutrition was provided alongside integrated community case management (ICCM) for malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia for children under five years old. We expanded outpatient therapeutic treatment services from 33 to 45 sites for treatment of severe acute malnutrition in children under five years, implemented continuous capacity building for health and community health workers, and promoted improved infant and young child feeding practices through Behaviour Change Communication at community mobilisation meetings.

 

Our Bangkok, Thailand, office is a support office for regional initiatives that Malaria Consortium is engaged in but also for technical support in specific projects where such skills may need strengthening. Examples of the latter are country-specific dengue vector control projects in Cambodia and Myanmar, where our Bangkok office regularly contributes ongoing entomological or other technical inputs, in some cases being Principal Investigators.

As an example of Regional inputs, our Bangkok team drives the Asia Pacific Malaria Elimination Network (APMEN) Vector Control Working Group (VCWG), which coordinates the development of vector control capacity-building interventions at an Asia-Pacific regional level, and oversees implementation of such initiatives. 

Our work in Uganda supported the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) to design and implement an intervention that sent health workers educational text messages on providing treatment for malaria in pregnancy (MiP). We successfully influenced policy and decision makers in The Ministry of Health (MoH) to increase Intermittent Preventative Treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) coverage in Uganda. The MoH pledged to reconsider how drugs are supplied to private sector health facilities, and committed to adopting the text messaging approach pilot tested in this study in its national malaria in pregnancy training strategy.

Our Malaria Action Program for Districts (MAPD) team assisted the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) to implement upsurge response activities such as mentoring case management health workers, identifying high malaria burden areas, and community interventions including Infection Prevention Control (IPC), home visits and outreaches.

MAPD is continuing to support the NMCP to write the Malaria Programme Review (MPR) report for 2014-2020. The MPR will inform the NMCP strategic plan for 2020-2025 as well as the next round of the Global Fund malaria grant.

Through our Regional Health Integration to Enhance Services in Eastern Uganda (RHITES-E) project, Malaria Consortium is supporting the Ministry of Health and 25 districts in eastern Uganda with the delivery of malaria prevention and treatment interventions, as well as with maternal, newborn and child care activities that are in line with WHO guidelines and the Uganda Malaria Reduction Strategic Plan 2014–2020.

 

While we do not have an office in Kenya, we supported the Division of National Malaria Programme to develop the Insecticide Resistance Management (IRM) plan (2020–2024). This will help Kenya to develop and implement appropriate insecticide resistance monitoring and management strategies to maintain the effectiveness of existing vector control interventions, and provide detailed guidance on selection and rotation of chemicals for indoor residual spraying (to delay development of insecticide resistance) and types of insecticide-treated nets to use in each epidemiological setting.

We are also supporting the Division of National Malaria Programme to develop the the Integrated Vector Control Strategy (IVCS) for Malaria Control. The IVCS incorporate strategies to develop capacities for entomological monitoring to support the planning, deployment and evaluation of locally appropriate and effective vector control interventions; and guidance for the selection and evidence-based targeting of effective interventions according to transmission intensity, insecticide resistance, cost-effectiveness considerations, and other relevant factors. All of the above activities were implemented within the US President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) VectorLink Project.

Since our establishment in 2003, Malaria Consortium has partnered with governments in Africa and Asia to implement evidence-based programmes that combat targeted diseases, promote child and maternal health, and improve lives.

This interactive map shows you the countries that we have run these programmes in and provides an insight into the many positive impacts we have had on policy development.

Click the circles in the middle of each highlighted country to learn more.

Sign up for our newsletters here: