Category Archives: Ethiopia

Exciting times for new pneumonia diagnostic tools

kevin-photo2This year’s ASTMH saw a number of key sessions and presentations that highlighted the exciting work being done to evaluate the performance of new pneumonia diagnostic aids at the community level.

Day one included a presentation by Dr. Michael Hawkes from the University of Alberta titled: ‘Solar powered oxygen delivery: a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial’. The presentation provided evidence for to show solar powered oxygen delivery can be an effective intervention in resource poor settings. The study was conducted in Jinja, Uganda and based on the results the project team is now planning to expand the work to another 85 health facilities in Uganda.

This was followed by Save the Children’s evaluation of the Philips ChARM device (Children’s Automated Respiratory Monitor) – an innovative and easy to use pneumonia-screening tool for low resource settings. The evaluation showed that the ChARM device is an acceptable alternate diagnostic tool for identifying fast breathing among children under five. 

On day two, Malaria Consortium’s US Representative, Madeleine Marasciulo, moderated a symposium titled ‘Key elements for improving management of pneumonia in children in resource poor settings’. The symposium was attended by over 200 people.

The event featured a presentation from Malaria Consortium’s African Technical Advisor, Dr Ebenezer Baba, ‘Progress towards universal access to pneumonia treatment’, as well as results from the pneumonia diagnostics study, presented by Pneumonia Diagnostics Programme Coordinator, Kevin Baker. The results highlighted the difficulty health workers face when counting respiratory rates and the need for better tools to support them to better detect the symptoms of pneumonia.

Following this, Kristoffer Gandrup-Marino, Chief ofInnovation at UNICEF Supply Division presented plans for the ARIDA project and the important factors to consider when developing pneumonia diagnostic trials at the community level in resource poor settings.
If the pneumonia diagnostics project showed us anything, it is the urgent need for user-friendly devices and for technological innovators to continue developing diagnostic tools for the millions of health workers who use them to count respiratory rates every day. The ARIDA trial is taking this forward, Kevin Baker said.

Finally, Dr Grant Aaron, Global Health Director at Masimo, presented ‘Scaling up Medical Oxygen and Pulse Oximetry – the case of Ethiopia’. Dr. Aaron highlighted the work being done to scale up oxygen management in Ethiopia as well as a new respiratory rate device being developed by Masimo.

On Tuesday evening an important session was held on the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Study (PERCH). PERCH is a multi-country, comprehensive evaluation of the etiologic agents causing severe and very severe pneumonia among children 28 days to 59 months with data collected between August 2011 and January 2014, with over 9,500 cases enrolled.

It was great to see such high quality sessions on pneumonia at ASTMH this year with several of the sessions presenting important findings for the first time. Community health delivery in remote or low resource settings will surely benefit from the new diagnostic tools and study results.

By Kevin Baker

pPanel photo from the pneumonia symposiump
Slideshow Thumbnail Slideshow Thumbnail Slideshow Thumbnail Slideshow Thumbnail Slideshow Thumbnail Slideshow Thumbnail

Malaria Consortium’s Edward Idenu receives best practice award

A child with severe malaria. Photo by William Daniels. 

In March, Malaria Consortium was invited to a meeting in Kampala, which brought together the partners of the Improving Severe Malaria Outcomes (ISMO) project. During this meeting I was delighted to receive an award for ‘Best Practice for Delivery’ in recognition of my work on the project.

A patient can make a complete recovery from severe malaria if it is caught in time and treated correctly. Unfortunately, however, of the estimated 216 million cases of malaria each year, approximately eight million of which are severe malaria cases, treatment is often too slow and makes use of incorrect drugs.

The ISMO project, comprising a consortium of partners: Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV), Clinton Health Access Initiative and Malaria Consortium, aims to strengthen the market to accelerate access to, and uptake of, injectable artesunate – the World Health Organisation’s preferred treatment for severe malaria. However, market barriers have hampered its uptake. The treatment is expensive and buyers often have concerns due to there being only one World Health Organisation (WHO) already tested and trusted supplier.

Low uptake of injectable artesunate has affected its accelerated adoption, preventing potential new suppliers to delay in making major commitments to marketing the drug. The treatment has also not been readily accepted by providers and patients, due to a lack of advocacy, education and training at all levels.

14189043654_3987a8411f_o

It is the role of the ISMO project to successfully create a stable and sustainable market for quality assured injectable artesunate with two or more suppliers, which will guarantee access to the treatment for severe malaria patients. This involves encouraging manufacturers to produce quality assured injectable artesunate and securing a commitment by donors to fund further production of the treatment.  The project is active in six countries, with Malaria Consortium focusing on implementation in Ethiopia, Nigeria and Uganda.

A major obstacle for countries implementing this project is the procurement, shipment, clearance and distribution of injectable artesunate. The process is often complicated by delays which lead to drug expiration, stock outs and subsequent poor uptake from clients. The duty of ensuring that these commodities are received and documented at the airport or sea ports is facilitated by the project with support from National Malaria Elimination programme (NMEP) – the government agency responsible for malaria interventions in Nigeria.

One of the key causes of delay is the time it takes for government documentation in support of the commodities to be issued by the Budget Office of the Federation, within the Federal Ministry of Finance, at the request of the Federal Ministry of Health. This cumbersome task normally takes between 8-12 weeks.

However, because of the strong partnership between NMEP, Malaria Consortium, and our partners in the Federal Ministry of Health, I managed to obtain a duty waiver for UNITAID injectable artesunate, to be used as part of the ISMO project, in just 14 days. It is for this that I received my award.

The timely receipt of the duty waiter ensured that the artesunate was cleared and distributed to all health facilities as planned. One of my main recommendations to partners working on this project is for all malaria commodities to be included in countries’ malaria strategic plans. This gives ownership to the government and ease of reference for commodities at the port of entry.

The award demonstrated the results that this project and its staff can achieve when they build networks and partnerships with government stakeholders. Going forward, the network established with key government partners will ensure speedy movement and delivery of commodities required for the next phase of the project.

Celebrating World Malaria Day in Ethiopia

On 25 April, hundreds of people travelled to Assosa Stadium – in Ethiopia’s western region of Benishangul-Gumuz – to celebrate World Malaria Day 2012.

Raising awareness of malaria is crucial in Benishangul-Gumuz, one of the few regions in the country where malaria transmission lasts for more than six months in the year.

The event, the first of its kind in the region, was organised by the Regional Health Bureau in partnership with the Ethiopian Ministry of Health, Malaria Consortium, WHO and others. Hundreds of local residents took part in the programme of events which included taekwondo, traditional wrestling and soccer tournaments, as well as music and poetry shows. Over 200 people were tested for malaria on the day.

Malaria Consortium’s Country Director for Ethiopia, Dr. Agonafer Tekalegne, spoke to attendees about the need for a joint effort to tackle malaria in the country. Reminding partners of the global theme of World Malaria Day 2012 – “Sustain Gains, Save Lives: Invest in Malaria” – Dr Tekalegne noted that in the midst of the Global financial crisis, efforts to manage gaps in funding locally would need to be stepped up.

Malaria represents the largest single cause of morbidity in Ethiopia and, due to climatic fluctuations and drought-related nutritional emergencies, large scale epidemics of the disease tend to break-out every five to eight years with devastating effects (UNICEF). Malaria Consortium has been working to complement the efforts of the Government and other actors in the fight against malaria in Ethiopia since 2004.

Read more about our work in the country here.